Teaser Tuesday: Sense and Sensibility

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

The old gentleman died; his will was read, and like almost every other will, gave as much disappointment as pleasure. He was neither so unjust, nor so ungrateful, as to leave his estate from his nephew; but he left it to him on such as destroyed half the value of the bequest.

pg. 4 of Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen.

PLEASE LEAVE A COMMENT with either the link to your own Teaser Tuesdays post, or share your 2 ‘teasers’ in a comment here (if you don’t have a blog). Thanks!

The Sunday Salon: Two-Part Film Adaptations

For those among us who have been living under a rock, the next three big book to film adaptations are Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (or, a generation grows up), Breaking Dawn (or, the death of Taylor Lautner’s career), and The Hobbit (or, I didn’t come with a funny name because I’m so freaking excited). The other thing all three of these films have in common? Well, as the Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows trailer puts it, they’re all “presented in two parts”. As fannish friends, reader friends, and filmmaker friends express approval over this trend, I often feel a bit awkward when I admit that I think it’s a terrible idea.

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Booking Through Thursday: Discussion

Do you have friends and family to share books with? Discuss them with? Does it matter to you?

It depends on the book, quite frankly. I’m able to have some lively discussions of Pride & Prejudice, The Lord of the Rings, and other popular works with my friends at school, and, of course, as an English major, dissecting and analyzing books is what I do. I have also horrified dozens of people with the plot of Breaking Dawn, which has turned into a downright monologue.

But when it comes to less popular books, I’m grateful for the Internet. It not only allows me to post my own thoughts on it, but see what other people thought of it as well, which wouldn’t happen in my circles. I think I’m quite lucky to have friends who are also readers and the Internet. Being a fan is also very rewarding in this aspect, since our love for our chosen fandom often spills over into sincere analysis of it. (You should see all the articles about race in Firefly!)

Booking Through Thursday: Now or Then?

Do you prefer reading current books? Or older ones? Or outright old ones? (As in, yes, there’s a difference between a book from 10 years ago and, say, Charles Dickens or Plato.)

While I theoretically don’t have a preference, since I like to think I gravitate more towards quality than newness, in practice, books published after 1950 dominate my reading list. The few old books are mostly classics–Ivanhoe, for instance.

It could be the long-winded writing style I sometimes see in 1800s novels that I don’t like, or the fact that I naturally gravitate towards fantasy, which Tolkien downright invented in 1954, although I do have a handful of pre-Tolkien fantasy novels on my reading list to educate myself about the genre. Maybe it’s a subconscious inclination for female protagonists. I can’t really explain myself here, but it might be because I’m fairly young and an English major in college–any desire to read classics is covered by my classes at the moment. I’m taking a class about race and Shakespeare (mmm, Shakespeare’s race issues) and an author study about Jane Austen, which should prove fascinating, although I will have to read Emma again. Thus, I don’t feel the need to seek out classics in my personal reading.

Review: Pride and Prejudice

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

When I was a wee lass, I remember there was a much abused paperback of Pride and Prejudice in the back of my parents’ car. I tried reading it once, but I think it was about the age I discovered I can’t really read in cars. I’ve somehow managed to get to eighteen without reading it, so I decided to correct that shameful omission.

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The Sunday Salon: HTML for Book Bloggers

When I was a wee lass, I taught myself HTML because of Neopets. Neopets is a website where you can have digital pets and play games, and it was huge for me and my friends when I was little. For each pet, you got your very own little web page to play around with. A dear friend of mine and I spent a great deal of time working on ours. She’s only gotten better at HTML as time has passed; I think I’ve forgotten a great deal of what I learned. (Any further attempts to learn any other type of coding have absolutely failed.)

Still, I know enough to be able to code posts by hand whenever WordPress is acting up, and I thought it might be nice to provide a refresher for everyone this morning. WordPress, in HTML mode, does provide a great deal of the basic HTML you need for blogging via buttons you simply need to press before and after words, but I think it’s useful to know the coding yourself.

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Teaser Tuesday: Pride and Prejudice

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

“Well,” said Charlotte, “I wish Jane success with all my heart; and if she were married to him to-morrow, I should think she had as good a chance of happiness as if she were to be studying his character for a twelvemonth. Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance.”

pg. 17 of Pride and Prejudice

PLEASE LEAVE A COMMENT with either the link to your own Teaser Tuesdays post, or share your 2 ‘teasers’ in a comment here (if you don’t have a blog). Thanks!

The Sunday Salon: Project Gutenberg

This past week, I started two proofreading gigs–one at my school newspaper and one at Distributed Proofreaders. Distributed Proofreaders is a website where registered volunteers help convert books in the public domain into e-books by proofreading the digitized text. There’s several rounds of proofreading and formatting, and at the end of it all, the book is added to Project Gutenberg.

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