Review: Captain America — Winter Soldier

Captain America: Winter Soldier by Ed Brubaker, Steve Epting, Michael Lark, John Paul Leon and Mike Perkins

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A little before The Avengers came out in theaters, I found myself at Oxford Comics in Atlanta. I’d successfully jumped into Journey Into Mystery, thanks to recommendations from the Internet, and was hoping to jump into The Avengers. My source for the Journey Into Mystery had given me the number of a recent certain issue that I could use as an in, but I’d forgotten it. In the corner, I flipped through a few issues, hoping to just chance across it, but didn’t find it. What I did find was a few pages where the Avengers all described Captain America—specifically, some of them had a feeling he was cosmically linked to the American nation-state.

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Page to Screen: Captain America — The Winter Soldier (2014)

Captain America: The Winter Soldier
based on a story by Ed Brubaker and characters by Joe Simon and Jack Kirby

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On May 6th, 2016, Captain America 3 (No Sleep Till Stalingrad, one presumes) will open opposite Batman Vs. Superman (Grimdark: The Movie, one presumes). This is not so much the two titans of the comic book world taking their eternal battle to the silver screen as much as it is Marvel asking DC and Warner Brothers if they want to see a pencil disappear. As Phase 2 of the Marvel Cinematic Universe comes to a close—we’ve only got Guardians of the Galaxy later this year and then its onto phase capper Avengers: Age of Ultron—the success of Marvel Studios (especially now that it’s in the hands of Disney) is envied and unparalleled. DC and Warner Brothers aren’t the only ones attempting to mimic the formula (although they are the only studio hilariously doing it backwards); Sony Pictures wants to do one Spiderman film a year and Fox’s The Wolverine may be the first in a line of films featuring single mutants. (X-Men Origins: Wolverine need not apply.)

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Review: Gotham Central — In the Line of Duty

Gotham Central: In the Line of Duty by Ed Brubaker and Greg Rucka with Michael Lark

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The first I’d ever read about how civilians might react to superheroes in a non-positive way was reading about Marvel’s Damage Control. The series (composed of four limited series) follows Damage Control, a construction company skilled in cleaning up the property damage left behind by all those superheroics. I was paging through my brother’s copy of Les Daniels’ Marvel at the time, and I was blown away by the idea that there might be consequences for those actions. (I was, like, seven.) I never picked up Damage Control, but Gotham Central appealed to me on the same basis: superheroes can make life tough for people just trying to do their job.

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