Review: Best Food Writing 2013

Best Food Writing 2013 edited by Holly Hughes

hughesbestfoodwriting2013

While only a few months separate my readings of Best Food Writing 2011 and Best Food Writing 2013, they’re worlds away from each other when it comes to my cooking and my own relationship with food. Providing for myself is quite a different experience from living with my parents or living at school. (There are no endless bowls of apples, for one.) On the one hand, there are some things that I love that I won’t be buying anytime soon, like smoked salmon. On the other hand, I’ve had to get more creative, resulting in baguettes stuffed with veggie puree and almond milk-based curry. (I’m lactose intolerant, so that’s always on hand.) Food is becoming something I have more and more control over, simply because I have to cook constantly. It is no longer a fun hobby I indulged in for friends’ birthdays and the holidays, but something I do everyday.

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Review: Don’t Stop Believin’

Don’t Stop Believin’ by Brian Raftery

Raftery_DontStop_mech.indd

If you’ve been reading this blog long, you’ll know that I adore bad music. The cheesier the more bombastic, and the more overproduced, the better, in my opinion. Accordingly, my karaoke song is “Total Eclipse of the Heart.” (I do both voices and, if the mood strikes, the synthesizer.) And yet, while wailing eighties power ballads to a crowd of strangers is a telling allegory for my life, I shy away from singing with people. It’s not stage fright—the public or an audience don’t register as “people” to me, so I can do that fine. It’s just that music, for me, can be intensely personal: I have songs that I adore that I will only listen to once in a very long while and songs I can’t listen to any more because they remind me of certain times in my life that I don’t want to revisit.

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Review: Best Food Writing 2011

Best Food Writing 2011 edited by Holly Hughes

hughesbestfoodwriting2011

I think the reason I like food writing so much is because it’s both personal and, if done correctly, visceral. I say “visceral” instead of “sensual,” because the latter, with all its positive, sexy connotations, would exclude such repulsive magic as Pete Wells’ disappointed letter to Guy Fieri in lieu of a review of his restaurant in Times Square. Even people who aren’t foodies (those exist, right?) have certain foods that mean something to them, even if it’s just how to eat an Oreo. (A stance that can, apparently, start fights. As for myself, I’m in the “fried Oreos” camp.) It’s the relationship between eater and food that fascinates me, thus my interest in historical cooking.

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Review: Friday Night Lights

Friday Night Lights by H. G. Bissinger

I do not understand sports. It took me halfway through watching Rudy to identify Rudy’s devotion to Notre Dame football to my geekier devotions and enjoy the film. (Sean Astin was amazing in it, but there’s neither here nor there.) I guess I just don’t have the sort of competitive streak that sports require. So when I saw Friday Night Lights at a book swap in my student center, I picked it up because I wanted to understand. I still don’t understand sports completely, but I have a better handle on it now.

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